Cultural contact and linguistic relativity among the Indians of northwestern California

by Sean O"Neill

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press in Norman

Written in English
Published: Pages: 354 Downloads: 575
Share This

Subjects:

  • Indians of North America -- California, Northern -- Languages,
  • Anthropological linguistics -- California, Northern

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 337-345) and index.

StatementSean O"Neill.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPM501.C2 O54 2008
The Physical Object
Paginationxix, 354 p. :
Number of Pages354
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22511175M
ISBN 100806139226
ISBN 109780806139227
LC Control Number2007035710

Anthropological Linguistics provides a forum for the full range of scholarly study of the languages and cultures of the peoples of the world, especially the native peoples of the Americas. Embracing the field of language and culture broadly defined, the journal includes articles and research reports addressing cultural, historical, and philological aspects of linguistic study, including. North American Indian languages, those languages that are indigenous to the United States and Canada and that are spoken north of the Mexican border. A number of language groups within this area, however, extend into Mexico, some as far south as Central present article focuses on the native languages of Canada, Greenland, and the United States. California Indian Languages by Victor Golla, editors University of California Press () Hupa Texts by Pliny Earle Goddard, editors Forgotten Books () [, Kindle - ] Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity among the Indians of Northwestern California . Published through the Recovering Languages and Literacies of the Americas initiative, supported by the Andrew W. Mellon FoundationThe general focus in Lakota.

1. Define the concept of linguistic relativity. 2. Differentiate linguistic relativity and linguistic determinism. 3. Define the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis (against more pop-culture takes on it) and situate it in a broader theoretical context/history. 4. Provide examples of linguistic relativity through examples related to time, space, metaphors, etc. Barasana (alternate names Barazana, Panenua, Pareroa, or Taiwano is an exonym applied to an Amazonian people, considered distinct from the Taiwano, though the dialect of the latter is almost identical to that of the Barasana, and outside observers can detect only minute differences between the two languages. They are a Tucanoan group located in the eastern part of the Amazon Basin in .

Cultural contact and linguistic relativity among the Indians of northwestern California by Sean O"Neill Download PDF EPUB FB2

Likewise, comparisons of different indigenous languages across similar cultural patterns has been hard to achieve. Contributing to the debate, and adding much needed data and evidence, is the recent book by Sean O'Neill: Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity Among the Indians of Northwestern by: 7.

Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity among the Indians of Northwestern California. By Sean O'Neill. $ Hardcover Add to Cart. $ Paperback Pre-Order Available February Social Science / Book Information 25 b&w illus., 1 map.

Examines the linguistic relativity principle in relation to the Hupa, Yurok, and Karuk Indians Despite centuries of intertribal contact, the American Indian peoples of northwestern California have continued to speak a variety of distinct languages.

At the same time, they have come to embrace a common way of life based on salmon fishing and shared religious practices. Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity among the Indians of Northwestern California by Sean O?Neill () on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity among the Indians of Northwestern California 5/5(1). Read "Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity among the Indians of Northwestern California (review), Anthropological Linguistics" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.

Review: Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity among the Indians of Northwestern California by Sean O’Neill. Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity Among the Indians of Northwestern California Sean O’Neill University of Oklahoma Press One of the most perplexing problems in the field of anthropology over the last hundred years has been the relationship between language and culture.

Examines the linguistic relativity principle in relation to the Hupa, Yurok, and Karuk Indians Despite centuries of intertribal contact, the American Indian peoples of northwestern California have continued to speak a variety of distinct languages.

At the same time. Brothers among Nations: The Pursuit of Intercultural Alliances in Early America, – By Cynthia J. Van Zandt. Reviewed by Jim J. Buss Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity among the Indians of Northwestern California.

Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity Among the Indians of Northwestern California. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. Google Scholar. Sean O’Neill is Associate Professor of Linguistics at the University of Oklahoma and the author of Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity among the Indians of Northwestern s: 1.

[] Anthropological Linguistics (). [Book Review. O'Neill, Sean () 'Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity Among the Indians of Northwestern California.'] Series: Photographs.

Roberts Collection duplicates (20 sheets) Roberts Collection duplicates. He is the author of Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity among the Indians of Northwestern California and the coeditor of Northwest California Linguistics, volume 14 of The Collected Works of Edward Sapir.

--This text refers to the hardcover : Louis V. Headman. Brothers Among Nations: The Pursuit of Intercultural Alliances in Early America, by Cynthia J.

Van Zandt. Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity Among the Indians of Northwestern California by Sean O'Neil. Epidemics and Enslavement: Biological Catastrophe in the Native Southeast, by Paul Kelton.

1) An excellent example of how closely language, identity, and land are tied together is found in O'Neill's book Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity Among the Indians of Northwest California.

2) For an example from Mesoamerica, see Reinventing the Lacandon: Subaltern Representations in the Rain Forest of s: Linguistic relativity is the claim that culture, through language, affects the way in which we think, and especially our classification of the experienced world.

This book reexamines ideas about linguistic relativity in the light of new evidence and changes in theoretical climate. Red Shirt’s book will soon be a classic itself.”—Sean O’Neill, associate professor of linguistic anthropology at the University of Oklahoma and author of Cultural Contact and Linguistic.

Sean O’Neillis Associate Professor of Linguistics at the University of Oklahoma and the author of Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity among the Indians of Northwestern California. O'Neill, Sean, Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity Among the Indians of Northwestern California, University of Oklahoma Press,ISBN 外部連結 [ 编辑 ] Babies think before they speak says Harvard professor.

The book’s content progresses from general to specific: from the notions of worldview and translation, through a consideration of how worldviews are shaped in and through language, to a discussion of worldviews in translation, both in macro-scale and in specific details of language structure and use.

O'Neill, Sean (), Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity Among the Indians of Northwestern California, University of Oklahoma Press, ISBN Swoyer, Chris (), "The Linguistic Relativity Hypothesis", Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy Archive. California Indian History. SHORT OVERVIEW.

basket making survived the years of suppression of native arts and culture to once again become one of the most important culturally defining element for Indians in this region.

The first was a series of Indian wars in Northwestern California. Here Yurok, Karok, Hupa and other tribes fought. Louis V. Headman (Ponca elder) (Oklahoma) is the project coordinator of the Ponca Language Grant and pastor of the Church of the Nazarene in Ponca City.

He is the author of Dictionary of the Ponca People (Nebraska, ).Sean O’Neill is an associate professor of anthropology at the University of Oklahoma. He is the author of Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity among the Indians Author: Louis V. Headman. Alaska Native Political Leadership and Higher Education: One University, Two Universes Joseph Thompson Journal of American Indian Education, Vol.

44, No. 1,pp. Book review of: Alaska Native Political Leadership and Higher Education by Michael Jennings. More information. Catching language; the standing challenge of grammar writing. Learning to read across languages; cross-linguistic relationships in first- and second-learning literacy development.

Crosslinguistic influence in language and cognition. Cultural contact and linguistic relativity among the Indians of northwestern California. in press Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity Among the Indians of Northwestern California, by Sean O'Neill. Anthropological Linguistics [journal publication delayed].

Anthropological Linguistics [journal publication delayed]. Each issue contains illustrated research articles and book reviews. Other regular features include primary documents, photo essays, interpretive essays, reminiscences, and reviews of research collections.

Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity among the Indians of Northwestern California by Sean O'Neill Cultural Contact and Linguistic.

University of California Press: Kockelman, Paul: Language, Culture and Mind: Cambridge: Mandeville, Francois: This is What They Say: University of Washington Press: O’Neill, Sean: Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity among the Indians of Northwestern California: University of Oklahoma Press: Park, Joseph: Local.

Kathryn Woolard, SLA President. The question of linguistic relativity is the topic of an Aug New York Times magazine article, “You Are What You Speak” Many linguistic anthropologists were surprised by the article’s representation of Benjamin Lee Whorf’s ideas and by the scant reference to the longstanding tradition of research in linguistic anthropology.

Louis Headman (Ponca elder) is the senior language researcher for the Ponca Tribe of Native Americans, project coordinator of the Ponca Language Grant, and pastor at the Church of the Nazarene in Ponca City.

Sean O’Neill is an associate professor of anthropology at the University of Oklahoma. He is the author of Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity among the Indians of Northwestern.

Walks on the Ground is a record of Louis V. Headman’s personal study of the Southern Ponca people, spanning seven decades beginning with the historic notation of the Ponca people’s origins in the East.

The last of the true Ponca speakers and storytellers entered Indian .Native American Placenames of the Southwest: A Handbook for Travelers, William Bright, edited with an Introduction by Alice Anderton and Sean O’Neill, pp. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.

Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity among the Indians of Northwestern California. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.

“To communicate effectively, speakers must also conceptualize their own experience in terms of the concepts that speakers habitually apply to their own experiences,” writes anthropologist Sean O’Neill in “Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity Among the Indians of Northwestern California.” Language plays a fundamental role in the.